Occupational Health and Safety Code

The Occupational Health and Safety Code provides specific technical health and safety rules and requirements for Alberta workplaces.

Alberta Regulation 191/2021

Part 23 Scaffolds and Temporary Work Platforms

Contents

Scaffolds
 

CSA Standard applies

 

323

Subject to sections 324 and 325, an employer must ensure that scaffolds erected to provide working platforms during the construction, alteration, repair or demolition of buildings and other structures comply with CSA Standard CAN/CSA S269.2‑M87 (R2003), Access Scaffolding for Construction Purposes.

 

Design

 

324(1)

An employer must ensure that a single pole or double pole scaffold is

(a) supported against lateral movement by adequate bracing,

(b) anchored by one tie‑in for each 4.6 metre vertical interval and one tie‑in for each 6.4 metre horizontal interval,

(c) anchored by one tie‑in for each 3 metre vertical interval and one tie‑in for each 3 metre horizontal interval if the scaffold is hoarded, and

(d) set plumb on a base plate, jackscrew or other load dispersing device on a stable surface.

324(2)

An employer must ensure that ropes or wire ropes used in scaffolding are

(a) protected against fraying or other damage, and

(b) made of heat or chemical resistant material if there is a possibility of exposure to heat or chemicals.

324(3)

An employer must ensure that wooden scaffolds are constructed of unpainted dressed lumber.

324(4)

Despite subsection (1)(c), an employer must ensure that hoarded masonry walk‑through scaffold frames

(a) are anchored by not less than one‑tie in for each 9 square metres of hoarding surface area, and

(b) have vertical tie‑ins spaced at least 2 metres apart but not more than 3 metres apart.

324(5)

If scaffolding or a temporary work platform can be damaged by powered mobile equipment or a vehicle contacting it, an employer must take reasonable measures to protect the scaffolding or temporary work platform from being contacted.

 

Load

 

325(1)

An employer must ensure that a scaffold is designed and constructed to support at least 4 times the load that may be imposed on it.

325(2)

An employer must ensure that the load to which a scaffold is subjected never exceeds the equivalent of 1/4 of the load for which it is designed.

325(3)

An employer must ensure that a scaffold used to carry the equivalent of an evenly distributed load of more than 367 kilograms per square metre is

(a) designed and certified by a professional engineer, and

(b) constructed, maintained and used in accordance with the certified specifications.

325(4)

Subsection (3) applies to a type of scaffold that is not otherwise specifically referred to in this Code.

325(5)

An employer must ensure that all workers on a scaffold are informed of the maximum load that the scaffold is permitted to carry.

 

Tagging requirements

 

326(1)

An employer must ensure that a scaffold is colour coded using tags at each point of entry indicating its status and condition as follows:

(a) a green tag with “Safe for Use”, or similar wording, to indicate it is safe for use;

(b) a yellow tag with “Caution: Potential or Unusual Hazard”, or similar wording, to indicate the presence of a potential or unusual hazard;

(c) a red tag with “Unsafe for Use”, or similar wording, to indicate it is not safe to use.

326(2)

An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold, double‑pole scaffold, needle‑beam scaffold, outrigger scaffold, single‑pole scaffold, suspended scaffold or swingstage scaffold erected but not immediately put into service, or not used for more than 21 consecutive calendar days, has a red tag at each point of entry until it is inspected and tagged by a competent worker for use.

326(3)

An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold, double‑pole scaffold, needle‑beam scaffold, outrigger scaffold, single‑pole scaffold, suspended scaffold or swingstage scaffold is inspected and tagged by a competent worker before it is used for the first time and at intervals of not more than 21 calendar days while workers work from the scaffold or materials are stored on it.

326(4)

A tag attached to a scaffold under this section expires 21 calendar days after the date of the inspection it records.

326(5)

A tag required by this section must include

(a) the duty rating of the scaffold,

(b) the date on which the scaffold was last inspected,

(c) the name of the competent worker who last inspected the scaffold,

(d) any precautions to be taken while working on the scaffold, and

(e) the expiry date of the tag.

326(6)

A worker must not use a scaffold if it has

(a) a red tag,

(b) a green or yellow tag that has expired, or

(c) no tag at all.

326(7)

Subsection (6) does not apply to a competent worker who is involved in the erection, inspection or dismantling of a scaffold.

326(8)

Repealed.

 

Vertical ladder on scaffold

 

327(1)

An employer must ensure that a vertical ladder that gives access to a working level of a scaffold is used by a worker only to move up or down between levels of the scaffold.

327(2)

Workers moving between levels of a scaffold on a vertical ladder

(a) must not extend a part of their body, other than an arm, beyond the side rails of the ladder, and

(b) must maintain a 3‑point stance on the ladder at all times.

327(3)

The employer must ensure that a ladder attached to a scaffold and providing access to a working level of a scaffold

(a) is securely fastened to the scaffold,

(b) does not lean away from the scaffold,

(c) extends at least 1 metre above the uppermost working level of the scaffold,

(d) has rungs that are uniformly spaced at a centre‑to‑centre distance of 250 millimetres to 305 millimetres,

(e) has a maximum unbroken length of 9.1 metres measured from the ground or between working levels, and

(f) is equipped with a ladder cage that begins within 2.4 metres of the ground or working level if the ladder is more than 6.1 metres in height.

327(4)

The employer must ensure that the ladder cage required by subsection (3)(f) is

(a) circular with an inside diameter that measures no more than 760 millimetres, or

(b) square with inside dimensions that measure no more than 760 millimetres by 760 millimetres.

327(5)

Despite subsection (3)(e) and (f), the ladder may have a maximum unbroken length of more than 9.1 metres and does not require a ladder cage if a fall protection system complying with Part 9 is used.

 

Working from a ladder

 

328(1)

An employer must ensure that no worker performs work from a ladder that is used to give access to the working levels of a scaffold.

328(2)

A worker must not perform work from a ladder that is used to give access to the working levels of a scaffold.

 

Scaffold planks

 

329(1)

An employer must ensure that a commercially manufactured scaffold plank is used, stored, inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

329(2)

An employer must ensure that a solid sawn lumber scaffold plank is

(a) graded as scaffold grade or better, and

(b) sized 51 millimetres by 254 millimetres.

329(3)

An employer must ensure that a solid sawn lumber scaffold plank

(a) is used, stored, inspected and maintained according to the manufacturer’s specifications, or

(b) if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, is made of at least number one grade lumber that is 51 millimetres by 254 millimetres with a wane limited to 20 percent of the width of the wide face of the plank and the warp limited to ensure a flat surface.

329(4)

An employer must ensure that a scaffold plank

(a) is visually inspected by a competent worker before it is installed in a scaffold,

(b) is subjected to and passes a load test before it is installed in a scaffold if a visual inspection reveals damage that could affect its strength or function,

(c) extends not less than 150 millimetres and not more than 300 millimetres beyond a ledger, and

(d) is secured to prevent movement in any direction that may create a danger to a worker.

329(5)

Despite subsection (4)(c), an employer must ensure that an overlapping scaffold plank extends not less than 300 millimetres beyond a ledger.

 

Scaffold platform

 

330(1)

An employer must ensure that the platform of a scaffold

(a) is a minimum width of 500 millimetres, except that a nominal 300 millimetre wide platform may be used with ladderjacks, pump jacks or similar systems,

(b) does not have an open space between the platform and a structure that is greater than 250 millimetres in width,

(c) if not level, is designed to ensure adequate footing for workers using the platform, and

(d) is continuous around obstructions that would create openings into or through which a worker might step or fall through.

330(2)

Repealed.

 

Metal scaffolding

 

331

An employer must ensure that

(a) metal scaffolding is erected, used, inspected, maintained and dismantled in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and

(b) the structural parts of metal scaffolding are securely fastened together as required by the manufacturer.

 

Bracket scaffolds

 

332(1)

An employer must ensure that a bracket scaffold

(a) is constructed, installed and used in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

(b) is securely attached to the support wall in a manner that prevents the bracket from dislodging, and

(c) is used only as a light duty scaffold.

332(2)

An employer must ensure that the brackets on a bracket scaffold are spaced at intervals of not more than 3 metres.

 

Double‒pole scaffolds

 

333(1)

An employer must ensure that uprights and ledgers

(a) of light duty double‑pole scaffolds are spaced not more than 3 metres apart, and

(b) of heavy duty double‑pole scaffolds are spaced not more than 2.3 metres apart.

333(2)

An employer must ensure that the dimensions of parts of wooden double‑pole scaffolds are not less than those specified in Schedule 6, Tables 1, 2, 3 and 4.

 

Free‒standing or rolling scaffolds

 

334(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) the height of a free‑standing or rolling scaffold is not more than 3 times its smallest base dimension,

(b) if outriggers are used to attain the 3 to 1 ratio, the outriggers are firmly attached and ensure the stability of the scaffold,

(c) if a vehicle is used instead of scaffold wheels to form a rolling scaffold, all parts of the scaffold are securely fastened together and the scaffold is securely attached to the vehicle,

(d) if outriggers are required to maintain the stability of a vehicle‑mounted scaffold, the outriggers are securely attached to the frame of the vehicle, and

(e) a rolling scaffold is equipped with locking wheels or there are blocks for the wheels.

334(2)

A worker must not remain on a rolling scaffold while it is being moved unless

(a) the height of its work platform is not more than twice its smallest base dimension, and

(b) the surface over which it travels is firm, level and free of hazards that may cause the scaffold to topple.

334(3)

A worker using a rolling scaffold must engage the wheel locking devices or block the scaffold against movement while the scaffold is stationary and a worker is working from the scaffold.

 

Half‒horse scaffolds

 

335(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a half‑horse scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold,

(b) half‑horse scaffold ledgers are not more than 3 metres apart, and

(c) half‑horse scaffold legs are not spliced or more than 5 metres high.

335(2)

An employer must ensure that the parts of a half‑horse scaffold are not less than the lumber sizes specified in Schedule 6, Table 5 or 6.

335(3)

If a part of a half‑horse scaffold is not made of lumber, an employer must ensure that the part is made of a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber.

 

Ladderjack scaffolds

 

336(1)

An employer must ensure that ladders used for ladderjack scaffolds are

(a) erected in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, or

(b) if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, are not more than 3 metres apart.

336(2)

An employer must ensure that brackets in a ladderjack scaffold are designed to

(a) be supported by the side rails of the ladder, or

(b) have at least 90 millimetres of width resting on the ladder rung.

336(3)

An employer must ensure that a ladderjack scaffold is not more than 5 metres high.

336(4)

An employer must ensure that there are not more than 2 workers at a time on a ladderjack scaffold.

336(5)

Despite sections 329 and 330, an employer may use a single commercially manufactured extendable painter’s plank or a commercially manufactured aluminum or laminated plank on a ladderjack scaffold.

 

Needle‒beam scaffolds

 

337(1)

An employer must ensure that beams supporting a needle‑beam scaffold

(a) are constructed of lumber, or a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber,

(b) are not less than 89 millimetres by 140 millimetres, and

(c) are placed on their edge.

337(2)

An employer must ensure that planks forming the working platform of a needle‑beam scaffold are pinned to prevent shifting.

337(3)

An employer must ensure that ropes supporting a needle‑beam scaffold have

(a) a breaking strength of at least 39 kilonewtons, and

(b) a diameter of not less than 16 millimetres.

337(4)

An employer must ensure that beam ends of a needle‑beam scaffold are provided with stops to prevent the ropes from slipping off the beam.

 

Outrigger scaffolds

 

338(1)

This section applies to outrigger scaffolds, including suspended outrigger scaffolds.

338(2)

If a reference in this section is made to lumber, a material that has properties equal to or greater than those of lumber may be used in its place.

338(3)

An employer must ensure that

(a) thrustouts are constructed of lumber that is 89 millimetres by 140 millimetres and placed on their edge,

(b) thrustouts do not extend more than 2 metres beyond the edge of the bearing surface,

(c) thrustouts are securely braced at the fulcrum point against movement or upset,

(d) the inboard ends of thrustouts are securely anchored against horizontal or vertical movement or upset,

(e) the inboard portion from the fulcrum point to the point of anchorage is not less than 1.5 times the length of the outboard portion,

(f) the maximum distance between thrustouts is 2.3 metres,

(g) if a working platform is suspended or thrust out, the platform is

(i) supported by vertical lumber hangers that are 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres or larger and not more than 3 metres long secured to the side of each thrustout and extending at least 300 millimetres above the top of each thrustout, and

(ii) secured to a block that rests on the top edge of each thrustout as an additional support,

(h) a suspended platform is supported by lumber beams that are 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres and that are

(i) secured to the vertical hangers at least 300 millimetres above the bottom of the hangers, and

(ii) resting on blocks that are secured to the side of the hangers below each beam as an additional support,

(i) working platforms are completely planked between the hangers, and

(j) a suspended platform is braced to prevent swaying.

338(4)

An employer must ensure that

(a) counterweights are not used,

(b) stops to prevent lateral movement of the hangers are fixed to

(i) the thrustout and block referred to in subsection (3)(g)(ii),

(ii) the ledgers and the blocks referred to in subsection (3)(h),

and

(c) materials are not stored on outrigger scaffolds.

 

Roofing brackets

 

339

An employer must ensure that a roofing bracket is

(a) constructed to support the loads that may be put on it,

(b) provided with effective non‑slip devices, and

(c) secured to the roof with nails.

 

Single‒pole scaffolds

 

340

An employer must ensure that

(a) a wooden single‑pole scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold and is not more than 9 metres in height,

(b) the uprights on a wooden single‑pole scaffold are spaced not more than 3 metres apart, and

(c) the dimensions and/or strength of members of single‑pole scaffolds are not less than those specified in Schedule 6, Tables 7 and 8.

 

Suspended scaffolds

 

341(1)

This section applies to suspended scaffolds other than suspended outrigger scaffolds or suspended swingstage scaffolds.

341(2)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a commercially manufactured suspended scaffold is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, and

(b) a suspended scaffold that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

341(3)

An employer must ensure that

(a) the upper end of the suspension rope terminates in a spliced loop in which a steel thimble or eye is securely inserted,

(b) the suspension rope is secured to a thrustout by a bolt passing through the shackle, the steel thimble or the eye and the bolt is drawn up tightly to the end plate of the shackle by a securing nut,

(c) the planks of the platform are laid tightly together and overlap the supporting ledgers at each end of the scaffold by at least 300 millimetres, and

(d) working platforms are not less than 1 metre wide.

341(4)

An employer must ensure that all parts of a suspended scaffold are inspected daily.

341(5)

An employer must ensure that

(a) thrustouts are securely anchored to the building,

(b) counterweights are not used for anchoring a thrustout, and

(c) a stop bolt is placed at the outer end of each thrustout.

341(6)

An employer must ensure that the working parts of a hoisting mechanism are left exposed so that

(a) defective parts of the mechanism can be easily detected, and

(b) an irregularity in the operation of the mechanism can be easily detected.

341(7)

An employer must ensure that a suspended scaffold platform has an enclosure that

(a) is on the 3 sides of the platform that are not adjacent to the building,

(b) is made of wire mesh that complies with section 322 or another material that is at least as effective at containing materials or equipment, and

(c) extends not less than 1 metre above the platform.

 

Swingstage scaffolds

 

342(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a commercially manufactured swingstage scaffold is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

(b) a swingstage scaffold that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer, and

(c) operating procedures are developed for a swingstage scaffold referred to in clause (b).

342(2)

If it is necessary for the safe operation of a swingstage scaffold with a platform, an employer must ensure that the platform is designed to prevent the swingstage scaffold from swinging or swaying away from the building or structure.

 

Requirements for swingstage scaffold

 

343(1)

An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold is used only as a light duty scaffold.

343(2)

An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold is suspended by at least 2 upper attachment points placed so that the suspension ropes are parallel.

343(3)

An employer must ensure that a platform is at least 500 millimetres wide and fastened to the stirrups.

343(4)

An employer must ensure that a platform is equipped with rollers or fenders that bear against the side of the building or structure to hold the platform at a distance from the wall sufficient to avoid an obstacle, but not so far as to allow a worker to fall through the space between the wall and the platform.

343(5)

An employer must ensure that a thrustout, clamp or parapet hook is tied back or otherwise secured to a solid part of the structure and cannot move or be dislodged.

343(6)

An employer must ensure that counterweights

(a) are firmly attached to the thrustouts,

(b) are heavy enough to counterbalance 4 times the maximum weight likely to be on the scaffold, and

(c) do not consist of bagged or loose material.

343(7)

An employer must ensure that power units on a swingstage scaffold are equipped with

(a) manually operated constant pressure controls, and

(b) positive drives for raising and lowering the scaffold.

343(8)

An employer must ensure that a swingstage scaffold platform has an enclosure that

(a) is on the 3 sides of the platform that are not adjacent to the building,

(b) is made of wire mesh that complies with section 322 or another material that is at least as effective at containing materials or equipment, and

(c) extends not less than 1 metre above the platform.

 

Safety on swingstage scaffolds

 

344(1)

An employer must ensure that if workers are required to be on a swingstage scaffold, the hoisting equipment is equipped with automatically operating locking mechanisms so that the suspension ropes cannot slip or run free.

344(2)

An employer must ensure that if workers are required to be on a manually operated swingstage scaffold,

(a) the hoisting mechanism is securely locked in a positive drive position, and

(b) the scaffold has a secondary anti‑fall device that connects the scaffold to the suspension rope at a point above the hoisting mechanism.

344(3)

An employer must ensure that a powered swingstage scaffold has a manually operated secondary mechanism or an escape device, other than the vertical lifeline used for fall protection, if workers cannot reach a safe exit when there is a mechanical failure or power failure.

344(4)

An employer must ensure that a worker on the stage of a swingstage scaffold can use the manually operated secondary mechanism or escape device referred to in subsection (3) to move the scaffold to a point at which the worker can exit safely.

344(5)

An employer must ensure that a suspension rope is long enough to reach the next working surface below the scaffold.

344(6)

An employer must ensure that the end of a suspension rope is doubled back and held securely by a cable clamp so that the hoisting machine cannot run off the end of the rope.

344(7)

An employer must ensure that 2 or more swingstage scaffolds are not linked together by bridging the distance between them.

 

Workers on swingstage scaffolds

 

345(1)

Before starting to work on a swingstage scaffold, a worker must inspect the scaffold to ensure that

(a) the thrustouts or parapet hooks are secured in accordance with section 343, and

(b) counterweights meet the requirements of section 343.

345(2)

A worker on a swingstage scaffold must ensure that

(a) all ropes from the scaffold that extend to the ground or a landing are prevented from tangling, and

(b) when the scaffold is being moved up or down on its suspension ropes, the stage is not out of level by more than 10 percent of its length.

345(3)

A person on a swingstage scaffold must

(a) remain between the stirrups at all times,

(b) not bridge the distance between the scaffold and any other scaffold,

(c) not use a vertical lifeline used for fall protection as a means of entering or leaving a swingstage, and

(d) not use bagged or loose materials as counterweights on the scaffold.

345(4)

An employer must ensure that if a worker may fall 3 metres or more while working from a suspended swingstage scaffold, the worker’s personal fall arrest system is connected to a vertical lifeline.

345(5)

Despite subsection (4), an employer may allow a worker using a swingstage scaffold to connect a personal fall arrest system to a horizontal lifeline or anchorage on the swingstage scaffold if the failure of one suspension line will not substantially alter the position of the swingstage scaffold.

Elevating Platforms and Aerial Devices
 

Worker safety

 

346(1)

An employer must ensure that a worker is not travelling in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the worker.

346(2)

A person must not travel in a basket, bucket, platform or other elevated or aerial device that is moving on a road or work site if road conditions, traffic, overhead wires, cables or other obstructions create a danger to the person.

 

Standards

 

347(1)

An employer must ensure that a self‑propelled work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a boom‑supported elevating platform that telescopes, articulates, rotates or extends beyond the base dimensions of the platform meets the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA B354.4‑02, Self‑Propelled Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms, or

(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.5‑2006, Boom‑Supported Elevating Work Platforms.

347(2)

Subsection (1) does not apply to a work platform mounted on a motor vehicle.

347(3)

An employer must ensure that a self‑propelled integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base and with its primary functions controlled from the platform meets the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN/CSA B354.2‑01 (R2006), Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms, or

(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.6‑2006, Self‑Propelled Elevating Work Platforms.

347(4)

An employer must ensure that a manually propelled, integral chassis elevating work platform manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 with a platform that cannot be positioned laterally completely beyond the base, that may be adjusted manually or using power and that must not be occupied when moved horizontally, meets the requirements of

(a) CSA Standard CAN3 B354.1‑04, Portable elevating work platforms, or

(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.3‑2006, Manually Propelled Elevating Aerial Platforms.

347(5)

An employer must ensure that a telescopic aerial device, aerial ladder, articulating aerial device, vertical tower, material‑lifting aerial device or a combination of any of them, when mounted on a motor vehicle, whether operated manually or using power, meets the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA C225‑00 (R2005), Vehicle‑Mounted Aerial Devices.

347(6)

An employer must ensure that a mast‑climbing elevating work platform that may be adjusted manually or using power meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.9‑1993, Mast‑Climbing Work Platforms.

347(7)

An employer must ensure that a vehicle mounted bridge inspection and maintenance elevating work platform meets the requirements of ANSI Standard ANSI/SIA A92.8‑1993 (R1998), Vehicle‑Mounted Bridge Inspection and Maintenance Devices.

347(8)

An employer must ensure that an order picker meets the requirements of ASME Standard B56.1‑2000, Safety Standard for Low Lift and High Lift Trucks.

347(9)

Repealed.

 

Permanent suspension powered work platforms

 

348(1)

An employer must ensure that the platform of a permanent suspension powered work platform

(a) is constructed, installed, operated, tested, inspected, maintained, altered and repaired in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z271‑98 (R2004), Safety Code for Suspended Elevating Platforms, or

(b) if it was installed before April 30, 2004, is certified by a professional engineer.

348(2)

For the purposes of subsection (1), the “rated capacity” in CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z271‑98 (R2004) is to be taken to mean the total weight of

(a) workers and hand tools, with a minimum aggregate weight of 115 kilograms per worker, and

(b) water and other equipment that the work platform is designed to lift at the rated speed.

 

Fork‒mounted work platforms

 

349(1)

An employer must ensure that a cage or work platform mounted on the forks of powered mobile equipment and intended to only support material is so designed and constructed that it is securely attached to the lifting carriage or forks of the powered mobile equipment, so that the cage or platform cannot accidentally move laterally or vertically and so that the powered mobile equipment cannot tip.

349(2)

An employer must ensure that a work platform mounted on the forks of powered mobile equipment and intended to support a worker

(a) is commercially manufactured or, if not commercially manufactured, is designed and certified by a professional engineer,

(b) has guardrails and toe boards, and

(c) has a screen or similar barrier that prevents a worker from touching any drive mechanism.

349(3)

An employer must ensure that the operator of the powered mobile equipment remains at the controls while a worker is on the elevated fork‑mounted work platform.

349(4)

A person must not be on a fork‑mounted work platform while the powered mobile equipment to which the platform is attached is moving horizontally.

 

Suspended man baskets

 

350

Moved to section 75.1

 

Boatswain’s chairs

 

351(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a commercially manufactured boatswain’s chair is assembled, used and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

(b) a boatswain’s chair that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

351(2)

An employer must ensure that a boatswain’s chair provides stable support for the user.

351(3)

An employer must ensure that a rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair is

(a) made of synthetic fibre with a breaking strength of at least 27 kilonewtons, and

(b) is compatible for use with the rigging hardware in the suspension system.

351(4)

An employer must ensure that a wire rope used to suspend a boatswain’s chair is

(a) of a type recommended for suspending boatswain’s chairs by the rope manufacturer, and

(b) is suitable for the hoist being used.

 

Temporary supporting structures

 

352(1)

An employer must ensure that a temporary supporting structure and every part of it, including metal scaffold components, are designed, constructed and braced in accordance with CSA Standard S269.1‑1975 (R2003), Falsework for Construction Purposes.

352(2)

Subsection (3) applies to a temporary supporting structure unless the requirements of CSA Standard S269.1‑1975 (R2003), Falsework for Construction Purposes are more stringent.

352(3)

An employer must ensure that a temporary supporting structure is certified by a professional engineer if the temporary supporting structure

(a) consists of shoring that is more than 3.7 metres in height,

(b) may transmit loads to another part of the structure that may not provide adequate support, or

(c) is designed to act as a unit composed of parts so connected to one another that a load applied to any part of it may alter the stresses induced in other parts.

352(4)

A professional engineer certification for the purposes of subsection (3) must show

(a) the size and specifications of the temporary supporting structure, including the type and grade of all materials for its construction,

(b) the loads for which the temporary supporting structure is designed,

(c) the sequence of loading or unloading the temporary supporting structure, if the loading or unloading sequence is critical to its stability, and

(d) the shoring sequence, as necessary, after the temporary supporting structure is stripped.

 

Fly form deck panels

 

353(1)

An employer must ensure that a fly form deck panel

(a) is capable of resisting a minimum horizontal load of 3.6 kilonewtons applied in any direction at the upper edge,

(b) has a safety factor against overturning of at least 2 to 1, and

(c) has a safety factor against sliding of at least 1.5 to 1.

353(2)

An employer must ensure that attachments to the panel are completed and secured before the fly form deck panel is detached from the hoist used to position the panel.

353(3)

An employer must ensure that erection drawings and procedures respecting a fly form deck panel are readily available to the workers who will assemble, fly, use, dismantle or reuse the panel.

353(4)

The erection drawings and procedures referred to in subsection (3) must include

(a) a plan view, longitudinal section and cross‑section of the panel,

(b) the calculated position of the panel’s centre of gravity,

(c) step‑by‑step procedures for all phases of assembly, flying, use, dismantling, repair and reuse of the panel,

(d) procedures for installing the panel on non‑typical floors, and

(e) any supplementary specifications for using the panels that are prepared by the manufacturer, a professional engineer or the employer.

353(5)

An employer must ensure that no person is on a fly form deck panel while it is being flown.

353(6)

A person must not be on a fly form deck panel while it is being flown.