Occupational Health and Safety Code

The Occupational Health and Safety Code provides specific technical health and safety rules and requirements for Alberta workplaces.

Alberta Regulation 191/2021

Part 25 Tools, Equipment and Machinery

Contents

 

Contact by clothing, etc.

 

362(1)

If contact between moving parts of machinery, electrically energized equipment or part of the work process and a worker’s clothing, jewellery or hair is likely, an employer must ensure that

(a) the worker’s clothing fits closely to the body,

(b) the worker does not wear bracelets, rings, dangling neckwear, a wristwatch or similar articles, and

(c) the worker’s head and facial hair is short or confined and cannot be snagged or caught.

362(2)

If contact between moving parts of machinery, electrically energized equipment or part of the work process and a worker’s clothing, jewellery or hair is likely, a worker must

(a) wear clothing that fits closely to the body,

(b) not wear bracelets, rings, dangling neckwear, a wristwatch or similar articles, and

(c) have head and facial hair that is short or confined and cannot be snagged or caught.

362(3)

Despite subsections (1) and (2), a worker may wear a medical alert bracelet that has a breakaway or tear away band.

 

Machines close together

 

363

An employer must ensure that a worker is not in danger because the machines installed at a work site are close to each other or to a worker.

 

Moving workers

 

364

An employer must ensure that machinery or equipment used to move, raise or lower workers is designed by the manufacturer or certified by a professional engineer as being appropriate for that purpose.

 

Repealed

 

364.1

Repealed.

 

Starting machinery

 

365(1)

An employer must ensure that an alarm system is installed if

(a) a machine operator does not have a clear view of the machine or parts of it from the control panel or operator’s station, and

(b) moving machine parts may endanger workers.

365(2)

The alarm system must effectively warn workers that the machine is about to start.

 

Preventing machine activation

 

366

An employer must install a positive means to prevent the activation of equipment if

(a) a worker is required, during the course of the work process, to feed material into the machine, or

(b) a part of the worker’s body is within the danger zone of the machine.

 

Operator responsibilities

 

367(1)

Before starting machinery, an operator must ensure that starting the machinery will not endanger the operator or another worker.

367(2)

While operating machinery, an operator must ensure that its operation will not endanger the operator or another worker.

 

Controls

 

368

An employer must ensure that an operational control on equipment

(a) is designed, located or protected to prevent unintentional activation, and

(b) if appropriate, is suitably identified to indicate the nature or function of the control.

 

Immobilizing machinery

 

369

A worker must not leave a machine, or a part of or extension to a machine, unattended or in a suspended position unless the machine is immobilized and secured against accidental movement.

 

Drive belts

 

370(1)

A worker must not shift a drive belt on a machine manually while the machine or motor is energized.

370(2)

An employer must ensure that a permanent drive belt shifter

(a) is provided for all loose pulleys on a machine, and

(b) is constructed so that the drive belt cannot creep back onto the driving pulley.

 

Continuous‒feed machinery

 

371

An employer must ensure that the drive mechanism of a powered, continuously fed feeder device permits the feeder mechanism to be stopped independently of the processing mechanism.

 

Elevated conveyor belts

 

372(1)

If an elevated conveyor belt passes over a walkway, an employer must ensure that the conveyor

(a) has side walls high enough to prevent materials from falling from it, and

(b) runs in a trough strong enough to carry the weight of a broken chain, rope, belt or other material that falls from the conveyor.

372(2)

A worker must use a walkway to cross over a conveyor belt if

(a) the conveyor belt is moving, or

(b) the conveyor belt is motionless but has not been locked out in accordance with Part 15.

372(3)

A worker must not cross under a moving conveyor belt except at a walkway.

 

Crossing conveyor belts

 

373(1)

A worker must cross over a conveyor belt using a bridge that is at least 1 metre wide and has adequate guardrails.

373(2)

Despite subsection (1), a worker may cross over a conveyor belt at a location other than a bridge if the belt is locked out.

373(3)

A worker must cross under a moving conveyor belt at a designated place where the worker is protected from moving parts of the conveyor and from material falling from the belt.

 

Actuated fastening tools

 

374

A worker must not permit the trigger of an actuated fastening tool to be mechanically held in the “ON” position unless the manufacturer’s specifications permit the tool to be used that way.

 

Grinders

 

375(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a grinder is operated in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and, subject to subsection (2), equipped with a grinder guard,

(b) the maximum safe operating speed of the grinder accessory in revolutions per minute is equal to or greater than the maximum speed of the grinder shaft in revolutions per minute, and

(c) if a hand held grinder is used, the object being ground cannot move.

375(2)

An employer must ensure that the guard of a hand held grinder covers the area of the grinder accessory contained within an arc of at least 120 degrees of the accessory’s circumference.

375(3)

An employer must ensure that if a tool rest is installed on a fixed grinder, the manufacturer’s specifications are followed if they exist, or the tool rest is

(a) installed in a manner compatible with the work process,

(b) securely attached to the grinder,

(c) set at or within 3 millimetres of the face of the wheel, and

(d) set at or above the centre line of the wheel.

375(4)

A worker must not

(a) grind material using the side of an abrasive wheel unless the wheel has been designated for that purpose, or

(b) adjust a tool rest while a grinder accessory is in motion.

 

Chainsaws

 

376(1)

An employer must ensure that a chainsaw

(a) is operated, adjusted and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and

(b) is designed or equipped with a mechanism that minimizes the risk of injury from kickback when the saw is in use.

376(2)

A worker must not adjust the chain of a chainsaw while the saw’s motor is idling.

 

Circular saw blades

 

377(1)

An employer must ensure that a circular saw blade with a crack of any size adjacent to the collar line, or with a crack elsewhere that exceeds the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 1, is

(a) removed from service, and

(b) replaced or repaired.

377(2)

If a circular saw blade has a crack near the periphery that does not exceed the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 1, an employer must ensure that

(a) the blade is removed from service and replaced,

(b) the crack in the blade is repaired, or

(c) the crack is prevented from getting longer by slotting, centre punching, drilling or another effective means.

377(3)

An employer must ensure that a circular saw that is repaired under subsection (1) or (2) is retensioned as necessary by a competent worker.

 

Band saw blades

 

378(1)

An employer must ensure that a band saw blade, other than a shake band saw blade, with a crack that exceeds the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 2, is

(a) removed from service and replaced, or

(b) the crack in the blade is repaired.

378(2)

An employer must ensure that a band saw blade, other than a shake band saw blade, with a crack that does not exceed the limits specified in Schedule 8, Table 2, is

(a) removed from service until the crack is repaired, or

(b) the crack is prevented from getting longer by centre punching or another means.

378(3)

An employer must ensure that a band saw that is repaired under subsection (1) or (2) is retensioned as necessary by a competent worker.

378(4)

A worker must not use a shake band saw blade that is cracked.

 

Band saw wheels

 

379(1)

Unless a manufacturer specifies or a professional engineer certifies otherwise, an employer must ensure that a cast steel band saw wheel measured 25 millimetres inboard from the rim edge has a minimum rim thickness

(a) of 14 millimetres for wheels up to and including 1.8 metres in diameter,

(b) of 16 millimetres for wheels more than 1.8 metres in diameter and up to and including 2.75 metres in diameter, and

(c) of 17.5 millimetres for wheels more than 2.75 metres in diameter.

379(2)

An employer must ensure that a band saw wheel that is more than 1.2 metres in diameter is tested for cracks at least once every 12 calendar months by a competent worker.

379(3)

An employer must ensure that a band saw wheel that has been exposed to excessive heat is removed from service until the wheel manufacturer or a professional engineer certifies it is safe for continued use.

 

Power‒fed circular saws

 

380(1)

An employer must ensure that a power‑fed circular rip saw with horizontal power‑driven infeed rolls has a sectional non‑kickback device located in front of the saw blade across the full width of the feed rolls.

380(2)

An employer must ensure that a power‑fed circular resaw has

(a) a splitter that is as high as the top of the saw, and

(b) a cover.

 

Cut‒off saws

 

381(1)

An employer must ensure that a hand‑operated cut‑off saw, other than a radial arm saw, is equipped with a device that returns the saw automatically to the back of the table when the saw is released at any point in its travel.

381(2)

An employer must ensure that a limit device is used to prevent a swing or sliding cut‑off saw from travelling past the outside edge of the cutting table.

 

Sawmill head rig

 

382(1)

An employer must ensure that a circular head saw has adjustable guides and a splitter that

(a) is located not more than 75 millimetres from the back of the head saw, and

(b) extends not less than 250 millimetres above the carriage bench.

382(2)

An employer must ensure that the upper half of a top saw on a circular head rig is covered.

382(3)

An employer must ensure that circular head saw guide adjustment controls are operated remotely from the guides.

 

Sawmill log carriage

 

383(1)

An employer must ensure that a sawmill log carriage has

(a) a substantial buffer stop at each end of the carriage travel,

(b) a carriage with a safety device that keeps the head blocks not less than 30 millimetres from the saw,

(c) each head block equipped with a dog, and

(d) sweepers at the front and back of the carriage to clear obstructions from the track.

383(2)

A worker must not use frayed or worn rope, whether fibre or wire, on carriage drives.

383(3)

An employer must ensure that a sawyer’s lever, operating the carriage drive mechanism, is designed and constructed to operate in the opposite direction from the direction the carriage travels if the operator’s position with respect to the carriage could put the operator in danger.

383(4)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a sawmill with a device for turning logs has a hold‑down device installed on the carriage, and

(b) a secure restraining device maintains the carriage drive control mechanism and the log‑turning control in neutral if the operator is not at the controls.

 

Robots

 

384(1)

An employer must ensure that the design, construction, installation, testing, start up, operation and maintenance of an industrial robot system comply with CSA Standard Z434‑03 (R2008), Industrial Robots and Robot Systems — General Safety Requirements.

384 (2) to (8)

Repealed.

 

Teaching a robot

 

385

If a worker is teaching a robot, an employer must ensure that

(a) only the worker teaching the robot is allowed to enter the restricted work envelope,

(b) the robot system is under the sole control of the worker teaching the robot,

(c) if the robot is under drive power, it operates at slow speed only or at a speed that is deliberately selected and maintained by the worker teaching the robot,

(d) the robot cannot respond to a remote interlock or signal that would activate the robot, and

(e) the worker is outside the restricted work envelope before the robot is returned to automatic operation.