Occupational Health and Safety Code

The Occupational Health and Safety Code provides specific technical health and safety rules and requirements for Alberta workplaces.

Alberta Regulation 191/2021

Part 6 Cranes, Hoists and Lifting Devices

Contents

General Requirements
Cantilever Hoists
Chimney Hoists
Hand‒Operated Hoists
Material Hoists
Mobile Cranes and Boom Trucks
Overhead Cranes
Personnel Hoists
Roofer’s Hoists
Tower and Building Shaft Hoists
Tower Cranes
Underground Shaft Hoists
Vehicle Hoists
Winching Operations
General Requirements
 

Application

 

59(1)

This Part applies to lifting devices, including cranes and hoists, with a rated load capacity of 2000 kilograms or more.

59(1.1)

This Part does not apply to drawworks on equipment that is subject to Part 37.

59(2)

Sections 60 to 74 apply to roofer’s hoists regardless of their rated load capacity.

59(2.1)

A hoist may only be used for vertical lifting or lowering if it complies with this Part and is designed and manufactured for vertical lifting or lowering.

59(3)

Despite subsection (2), sections 63, 64(4) and 65 do not apply to roofer’s hoists.

59(4)

Despite subsection (1), an employer must ensure that a lifting device with a rated load capacity of less than 2000 kilograms has the rated load capacity of the equipment shown on the equipment.

 

Not commercially manufactured

 

60

If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it is fit and safe for use as a lifting device and that it is certified by a professional engineer.

 

Identification of components

 

61

An employer must ensure that all major structural, mechanical and electrical components of a lifting device are permanently and legibly identified as being component parts of a specific make and model of lifting device.

 

Rated load capacity

 

62(1)

An employer must ensure that a lifting device has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows

(a) the manufacturer’s rated load capacity,

(b) the manufacturer’s name, and

(c) the model, serial number and year of manufacture or shipment date.

62(1.1)

Repealed.

62(2)

If a lifting device is not commercially manufactured, an employer must ensure that it has a plate or weatherproof label permanently secured to it that legibly shows the rated load capacity according to the professional engineer’s certification.

62(3)

Subsections (1) and (2) do not apply to A‑frames and gin poles.

 

Load charts

 

63(1)

An employer must ensure that a mobile crane or boom truck is equipped at all times with load charts showing the rated load capacity of the mobile crane or boom truck at all permitted boom angles and boom radii.

63(2)

An employer must ensure that a tower crane has a load chart

(a) conspicuously and permanently secured to the cab, and

(b) showing the manufacturer’s rated capacity loads at various radii of a 2‑part line and a 4‑part line separately.

 

Operator requirements

 

64(1)

An employer must ensure that a lifting device is only operated by a competent worker authorized by the employer to operate the equipment.

64(2)

At the employer’s request, an operator, before operating a lifting device, must be able to demonstrate that the worker is competent in the equipment’s operation and knowledgeable about load charts and the code of signals for hoisting operations.

64(3)

No worker other than the competent worker authorized by the employer may operate a lifting device.

64(4)

Before operating a particular lifting device, the operator must be familiar with all recent entries in its log book.

 

Log books

 

65(1)

An employer must set up a paper or electronic log book for each lifting device at a work site.

65(1.1)

Despite subsection (1), the log book requirement does not apply to manually operated hoists.

65(2)

The employer must ensure that

(a) the log book is readily available for inspection by an officer at any time,

(b) the most current log book of a mobile crane accompanies it or is available to the operator at all times, and

(c) if ownership of a lifting device is transferred, the log book is transferred with the equipment.

65(3)

The employer must ensure that the following details are entered into the log book:

(a) the date and time when any work was performed on the lifting device;

(b) the length of time in lifting service

(i) recorded as hours of service if the lifting device is equipped by the manufacturer with an hour meter, or

(ii) if required by the manufacturer’s specifications;

(c) all defects or deficiencies and when they were detected;

(d) inspections, including examinations, checks and tests, that are performed, including those specified in the manufacturer’s specifications;

(e) repairs or modifications performed;

(f) a record of a certification under section 73;

(g) any matter or incident that may affect the safe operation of the lifting device;

(h) any other operational information specifically identified by the employer;

(i) in the case of a tower crane, whether or not the weight testing device was lifted for that working day, before the work of lifting loads began.

65(4)

The employer must ensure that each entry in a paper log book is signed by the person doing the work.

65(5)

The employer must ensure that each entry in an electronic log book identifies the person doing the work.

65(6)

In the case of a tower crane, the employer must ensure that a senior representative of the employer at the work site confirms that the entries in the log book are correct every day that the tower crane is in operation.

 

Preventing an unsafe lift

 

66

If the operator of a lifting device has any doubts as to the safety of workers in the vicinity of the lift, the operator must not move any equipment or load until the operator is assured that the working conditions are safe.

 

Preventing collisions

 

67

An employer must ensure that procedures are developed to prevent collisions if 2 or more lifting devices are in use and there is the potential for a collision between them, their loads or component parts.

 

Load weight

 

68

An employer must ensure that the operator of the lifting device, the rigger supervised by the operator and the person in charge of a lift are provided with all the information necessary to enable them to readily and accurately determine the weight of the load to be lifted.

 

Lift calculation

 

68.1

An employer must ensure that a lift calculation is completed for any lift exceeding 75 percent of a crane’s rated capacity.

 

Loads over work areas

 

69(1)

An employer must ensure that work is arranged, if it is reasonably practicable, so that a load does not pass over workers.

69(2)

An operator of a lifting device must not pass the load on the device over workers unless

(a) no other practical alternative exists in the circumstances, and

(b) the workers are effectively warned of the danger.

69(3)

A worker must not stand or pass under a suspended load unless the worker has been effectively warned of the danger and the operator of the lifting device knows the worker is under the suspended load.

69(4)

The operator of a lifting device that is travelling with a load must ensure that the load is positioned as close to the ground or grade as possible.

 

Tag and hoisting lines

 

70(1)

If workers are in danger because of the movement of a load being lifted, lowered or moved by a lifting device, an employer must ensure that

(a) a worker uses a tag line of sufficient length to control the load,

(b) the tag line is used in a way that prevents the load from striking the worker controlling the tag line, and

(c) a tag line is used when it allows worker separation from the load.

70(2)

An employer must ensure that tag lines of non‑conductive synthetic rope are used when there is a danger of contact with energized electrical equipment.

70(3)

An employer must ensure that tag lines are not used in situations where their use could increase the danger to workers.

 

Hand signals

 

71

An employer must ensure that hand signals necessary to ensure a safe hoisting operation are given in accordance with section 191 by a competent signaller designated by the employer.

 

Controls

 

72(1)

Moved to section 95.1

72(2)

Repealed.

72(3)

The employer must ensure that an operator who uses a remote control to operate a lifting device is visually distinguishable from other workers at the work site.

 

Repairs and modifications

 

73(1)

An employer must ensure that structural repairs or modifications to components of a lifting device are

(a) made only under the direction and control of a professional engineer, and

(b) certified by the professional engineer to confirm that the workmanship and quality of materials used has restored the components to not less than their original capacity.

73(2)

If structural repairs or modifications are made, the employer must ensure that

(a) the repaired or modified components are individually and uniquely identified in the log book and on the component, and

(b) the professional engineer’s certification makes reference to those components and their identification.

 

Containers for hoisting

 

74(1)

An employer must ensure that a container used for a load being lifted by a hoist is designed for that particular purpose and bears a marking to indicate its maximum load rating.

74(2)

A person must not use an oil drum or similar container as a container for a load being lifted by a hoist unless the drum or container is hoisted in a cage designed for that purpose.

 

A‒Frames and gin poles

 

75

An employer must ensure that an A‑frame or gin pole

(a) is not inclined more than 45 degrees from the vertical,

(b) is equipped with a boom stop, and

(c) has the sheave and cap of its rigging attached securely enough to the gin pole to withstand any loads to which the assembly may be subjected.

 

Suspended personnel baskets

 

75.1(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a commercially manufactured suspended personnel basket is erected, used, operated and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer, or

(b) a suspended personnel basket that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

75.1(2)

Despite section 147, if it is not practicable to provide a separate personal fall arrest system using a vertical lifeline for each worker in the man basket, an employer must ensure that

(a) a separate support is attached between the suspended personnel basket and the hoist line above the hook assembly that is capable of withstanding the weight of the personnel basket, materials, equipment and workers should the hook assembly fail, and

(b) each worker within the personnel basket is wearing a separate personal fall arrest system attached to the personnel basket.

Cantilever Hoists
 

Installation and use

 

76

An employer must ensure that a cantilever hoist

(a) is anchored to a building or structure at distance intervals that meet the manufacturer’s specifications or specifications certified by a professional engineer,

(b) has a foundation that is solid, level and of a size and strength capable of supporting the weight of the hoist and its loads under all working conditions, and

(c) carries loads that do not project beyond the edges of the material landing platform or the skip of the hoist.

Chimney Hoists
 

Equipment requirements

 

77

An employer must ensure that a chimney hoist

(a) is equipped with positive drives,

(b) does not have a clutch between the transmission and the hoist drums,

(c) is equipped with a speed indicating device if the hoist is capable of operating at speeds of more than 0.6 metres per second,

(d) is equipped with at least 2 independent braking systems, each capable of stopping 150 percent of the manufacturer’s rated capacity load at the manufacturer’s rated capacity maximum speed,

(e) has a roller or ball bearing swivel installed between the bucket and the rope on the hoist,

(f) is equipped with a communication system that informs the operator when the hoist is to be used to lift or lower workers, and

(g) has a separate safety line attached between the bucket or man basket yoke and the hoist rope above the ball or hook.

 

Operator responsibilities

 

78(1)

An operator of a chimney hoist must not

(a) lift or lower a worker at a speed of more than 0.6 metres per second,

(b) use the brake alone to control the speed of the chimney hoist when a worker is being lowered,

(c) lift or lower more than 2 workers at the same time, or

(d) lift or lower materials or equipment at the same time as a worker.

78(2)

An operator of a chimney hoist must use safety latch hooks or shackles equipped with safety pins.

 

Worker in lifting device

 

79

An employer must ensure that a worker who is lifted or lowered by a chimney hoist uses a personnel basket.

Hand‒Operated Hoists
 

Holding suspended load

 

80

An employer must ensure that a hand‑operated hoist is provided with a device capable of holding the total load suspended safely under all operating conditions.

Material Hoists
 

Safety code for material hoists

 

81

A material hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z256‑M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Material Hoists.

 

Rider restriction

 

82(1)

A person must not ride on a material hoist.

82(2)

An employer must ensure that a worker does not ride on a material hoist.

 

Gate interlocks

 

83

An employer must ensure that a material hoist is equipped at each floor or level with devices that prevent

(a) a landing gate from being opened unless the hoist platform is positioned at that landing, or

(b) movement of the hoist platform when a landing gate is open.

 

Operator responsibilities

 

84

A material hoist operator must not

(a) leave the hoist controls unattended while the skip, platform or load is in the lifted position, or

(b) move the skip, platform or cage until the operator is informed by a designated signaller that it is safe to do so.

 

Signal systems

 

85(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) if a signal system is used to control the movement of a material hoist, the signal descriptions are posted at each floor or level and at the operator’s station,

(b) the operator of a material hoist, and a designated signaller at the floor or level where loading and unloading is being performed, maintain visual or auditory communication with each other at all times during loading and unloading, and

(c) if an electrical or mechanical signal system has been installed to coordinate the movement of the hoist’s skip, platform or cage, the system is arranged so that the hoist operator knows from which floor or level a signal originates.

85(2)

An employer must ensure that a material hoist erected at a building that is more than 20 metres high has a signal system that

(a) is installed at each floor or level and at the operator’s station,

(b) is designed to allow voice communication between a worker at any floor or level and the operator, and

(c) informs the operator from which floor or level the signal originates.

 

Hoist brakes

 

86

An employer must ensure that a material hoist’s braking system is capable of stopping and holding the total load suspended safely, under all operating conditions.

 

Location protected

 

87

An employer must ensure that

(a) the area around the base of the material hoist is fenced or otherwise barricaded to prevent anyone from entering it if the hoist platform is not at the base level,

(b) a removable guardrail or gate is installed between 600 millimetres and 900 millimetres away from the edge of a floor or level served by the material hoist, and

(c) if the operator controls are not remote from the material hoist, overhead protection is provided for the operator.

Mobile Cranes and Boom Trucks
 

Safety code for mobile cranes

 

88

A mobile crane must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes with the exception of clauses 1.6 and 1.7.

 

Personnel baskets

 

88.1

Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that

(a) a personnel basket used with a mobile crane is designed, constructed, maintained and used in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes, clause 5.4.7, or

(b) a personnel basket that is not commercially manufactured is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

 

Non‒destructive testing

 

89

An employer must ensure that all load‑bearing components of a mobile crane undergo non‑destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications at 12‑month intervals from the date of the mobile crane’s most recent certification.

 

Counterweights and outriggers

 

90

If outriggers are installed on a mobile crane or boom truck, the employer must ensure the outriggers are extended and supported by solid footings before being used.

 

Warning device

 

91

An employer must ensure that a mobile crane is equipped with an effective warning device in addition to the one required by section 267, that

(a) is readily accessible to the operator,

(b) is sufficient to warn workers of the impending movement of the crane, and

(c) if it is an auditory warning device, has a distinct sound that is distinguishable from all other sounds at the work site.

 

Preventing damage

 

92(1)

If a boom is fitted on a mobile crane or boom truck and the crane or truck may overturn or flip backwards because of the return movement of the boom, an employer must ensure that

(a) positive boom stops are installed in the crane or truck in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications, and

(b) a boom stop limit device is installed to prevent the boom from being drawn back beyond a predetermined safe boom angle.

92(2)

If a jib is attached to the boom of a mobile crane or boom truck, an employer must ensure that a jib stop device is installed in the crane or truck to prevent the jib from being drawn back over the boom.

92(3)

An employer must ensure that blocking procedures are developed to prevent the collapse or upset of any part of a derrick, mast or boom during the installation, removal or replacement of a derrick or the mast or boom section of a mobile crane or boom truck.

 

Load blocks

 

92.1

Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that the load blocks of a mobile crane are maintained and repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are no manufacturer’s specifications, in accordance with CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z150‑98 (R2004), Safety Code on Mobile Cranes, clause 4.3.5.2.

 

Outriggers

 

92.2

Despite section 88, an employer must ensure that a mobile crane equipped with outriggers is set up with the outriggers on load bearing floats or pads that are of adequate size, strength and rigidity.

Overhead Cranes
 

Electrical components and functions

 

93

A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the design requirements for electrical components and functions of

(a) CSA Standard C22.1‑06, Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1, Section 40, and

(b) CSA Standard C22.2 No. 33‑M1984 (R2004), Construction and Test of Electric Cranes and Hoists.

 

Maintenance and inspection

 

94

A bridge, jib, monorail, gantry or overhead travelling crane must meet the safety requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA B167‑96 (R2007), Safety Standard for Maintenance and Inspection of Overhead Cranes, Gantry Cranes, Monorails, Hoists and Trolleys.

 

Safe movement

 

95

An employer must ensure that a crane operating on rails, tracks or trolleys

(a) has a positive stop or limiting device on the crane or on the rails, tracks or trolleys to prevent it from overrunning safe limits or contacting other equipment that is on the same rail, track or trolley,

(b) is equipped with an overspeed limiting device,

(c) has positive means of ensuring that the rails, tracks or trolleys cannot be spread or misalign,

(d) has sweep guards installed to prevent material on the rail, track or trolley from dislodging the crane, and

(e) has a bed designed to carry all anticipated loads.

 

Controls

 

95.1

An employer must ensure that the controls of an overhead crane are of a constant manual pressure type.

Personnel Hoists
 

Safety code for personnel hoists

 

96

Except for a personnel hoist used in a mine, a personnel hoist must meet the requirements of CSA Standard CAN/CSA Z185‑M87 (R2006), Safety Code for Personnel Hoists.

Roofer’s Hoists
 

Safe use and design

 

97(1)

An employer must ensure that a roofer’s hoist has counterweights

(a) designed as a component part of the hoist to remain securely attached to the hoist until all lifting is completed, and

(b) heavy enough to counterbalance 4 times the maximum weight of the load being lifted.

97(2)

A person must not use roofing materials as a counterweight.

97(3)

An employer must ensure that a roofer’s hoist is inspected daily by a competent worker designated by the employer.

97(4)

An employer must ensure that bolts and pins used to interconnect component parts of a roofer’s hoist are equipped with safety pins that prevent them from being dislodged.

97(5)

A worker must

(a) use a roofer’s hoist only for vertical lifting, and

(b) not exceed the design load limits of the roofer’s hoist.

97(6)

An employer must ensure that a gallows frame roofer’s hoist is constructed of lumber sized as follows, or of material that has the same or greater properties as the lumber used for the same function:

(a) thrustout — 38 millimetres by 184 millimetres lumber;

(b) uprights — 90 millimetres by 90 millimetres lumber;

(c) braces and base plates — 38 millimetres by 140 millimetres.

97(7)

An employer must ensure that a gallows frame roofer’s hoist

(a) has a hoisting line with a breaking strength of not less than 25 kilonewtons,

(b) has thrustouts placed on their edge that do not overhang more than 1/4 of their length, and

(c) has sheaves securely attached to the thrustouts without using single-strand wire or nails.

Tower and Building Shaft Hoists
 

Protective enclosure

 

98

An employer must ensure that

(a) a tower hoist is enclosed at ground level with solid walls or equally effective fencing to a height of at least 2 metres on all sides except the loading side,

(b) a hoist shaft inside a building is enclosed on all sides but the landing side at all floors or levels to a height of at least 2 metres with solid walls or equally effective fencing,

(c) a landing gate inside a building does not open unless the hoist platform is positioned at that landing,

(d) the landing side of the hoist shaft inside a building has an access door complete with a lock and an “OPEN SHAFT” sign attached to the enclosure,

(e) a tower or building shaft hoist is braced, guyed or supported at vertical intervals of not more than 6 metres or at the intervals in the manufacturer’s specifications, and

(f) the bottom pulley block or sheave is securely anchored and the pulley and hoisting ropes to the hoisting engine are enclosed.

 

Design

 

99

An employer must ensure that a boom is not installed on a tower hoist unless its design is certified by a professional engineer to the effect that the tower structure can withstand the additional load.

Tower Cranes
 

Safety code for tower cranes

 

100

A tower crane manufactured on or after July 1, 2009 must meet the requirements of CSA Standard Z248‑04, Code for Tower Cranes.

 

Limit devices

 

101(1)

An employer must ensure that a tower crane is equipped with

(a) an overload device consisting of a hoist overload switch that automatically restricts the weight of the load,

(b) a travel limit device consisting of a moment overload switch that automatically restricts the radius within which the load can travel,

(c) a height limit switch that prevents the load from being overwound, and

(d) trolley travel limit devices consisting of a “trolley in” limit switch and a “trolley out” limit switch that prevent the trolley from running to the end of its track and falling off.

101(2)

An employer must ensure that the devices described in subsection (1) are adjusted and set in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications and have their limit switches sealed.

 

Operation

 

102

An operator of a tower crane must

(a) ensure the safe movement of the crane and its load at all times,

(b) verify at the beginning of each work shift that the mast is plumb, and

(c) verify at least once in each 24‑hour period that the limit devices described in section 101 are operational.

 

Changing components

 

103(1)

An employer must ensure that the major structural, mechanical and electrical components of a tower crane are not interchanged with those of other tower cranes unless

(a) the components are from the same make or model of tower crane,

(b) the components are approved by the manufacturer as suitable for their intended application, or

(c) the components are certified by a professional engineer as suitable for their intended application.

103(2)

An employer must ensure that if an operator’s cab is attached to the boom of a tower crane, the design of the cab, its position, method of attachment and any structural changes, including changes to the counterweight, capacity and operation of the crane, are in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications or are certified by a professional engineer.

 

Test weights

 

104(1)

An employer must ensure that if weights are used as a weight-testing device on a tower crane,

(a) the true weight of the test weight is determined and legibly recorded on the weight, and

(b) when not in use, the test weights rest on supports to prevent the weights from freezing to the ground or creating a vacuum when lifted.

104(2)

The employer must ensure that the lifting attachment on a test weight is made of mild steel and of sufficient size and strength to support the weight.

 

Structural testing and examination

 

105(1)

An employer must ensure that all structural and rigging components of a tower crane undergo non‑destructive testing under the direction and control of a professional engineer in accordance with the manufacturer’s specifications

(a) as close as reasonably practicable to the project site,

(b) before the crane is used for the first time in a project in Alberta, and

(c) if the crane is moved from project to project, before it is used after the move.

105(2)

If a tower crane is in operation on a project for more than one year from the date on which the crane starts operating, the employer must ensure its structural components are examined under the direction and control of a professional engineer after each period of 2000 operating hours or 12 months after the date on which it starts operating, whichever occurs first.

105(3)

The employer must ensure that the results of the testing or examination required by subsections (1) and (2) are certified by a professional engineer in a report that clearly identifies the crane and the components to which the information relates.

 

Wind and temperature limitations

 

106(1)

An employer must ensure that operation of a tower crane is stopped when the wind velocity at the elevation of the crane exceeds the limit recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are none, in specifications certified by a professional engineer.

106(2)

An employer must ensure that operation of a tower crane is stopped when the temperature in the vicinity of the crane is below the limit recommended in the manufacturer’s specifications or, if there are none, in specifications certified by a professional engineer.

 

Multiple cranes

 

107

If 2 or more tower cranes are erected in such a manner that the radii of operations overlap,

(a) the employer must ensure that operators are provided with a visual or auditory means of communicating with each other,

(b) the operators must be able to communicate with each other when both cranes are in operation, and

(c) the operators must operate the cranes in such a manner that there are no collisions between the cranes or their loads.

Underground Shaft Hoists
 

Safety requirements

 

108(1)

An employer must ensure that an underground shaft hoist complies with the following:

(a) all supporting parts of the hoist machinery are set on and secured to a substantial foundation;

(b) it is equipped with positive drives for lifting and lowering the hoist cage;

(c) it does not have a clutch between the transmission and the hoist drums;

(d) it has a hoist drum with a spring‑activated drum friction brake capable of stopping and holding the total suspended load in a safe manner under all operating conditions;

(e) it has a hoist drum equipped with a positive spring activated pawl or similar device to lock the drum.

108(2)

An employer must ensure that an underground shaft hoist

(a) has a communication system available and working at all times between the hoist operator and workers at landings in the shaft leading to a tunnel or an underground space, and

(b) the controls of the communication system can be operated at all times at every landing in the shaft, on the hoist platform and at the operator’s position.

108(3)

An employer must ensure that in an emergency an additional means of communication is available and working at all times between the operator of a shaft hoist and workers at the face of the tunnelling operations.

108(4)

An employer must ensure that, if a code is used in a communication system in an underground shaft hoist, the code is prominently posted at all times at every landing in the shaft and at the operator’s controls.

 

Operator responsibilities

 

109(1)

The operator of an underground hoist must

(a) ensure that the brake remains on at all times until it is released manually,

(b) hold the hoist drum brake in the “OFF” position when lifting or lowering the hoist cage, and

(c) not lock out or otherwise disable the hoist drum brake when lifting or lowering the hoist cage.

109(2)

The operator of an underground hoist must not allow the hoist to travel at more than 1.2 metres per second when a worker is lifted or lowered in the hoist cage.

 

Hoist cage

 

110(1)

An employer must ensure that

(a) a hoist cage platform is equipped with a car‑locking device, and

(b) the shaft on which an underground shaft hoist is installed is equipped with guide rails.

110(2)

An employer must ensure that a hoist cage has a plate that

(a) states the maximum number of workers and the maximum load for which the hoist cage is designed,

(b) is secured to the hoist cage, and

(c) is clearly visible to the workers in the cage and the operator.

110(3)

A person must not use an open hook to attach a hoist cage to the hoisting line.

 

Unguided suspended cage

 

111(1)

Despite sections 108 to 110, an employer may use a suspended cage that does not have guide rails in an underground shaft if

(a) the movement of the cage is controlled by a crane,

(b) all sides and the top of the cage are enclosed by a screen of sufficient strength to protect any workers being transported in it, and

(c) a designated signaller at the surface has constant effective communication between the cage occupants and the crane operator.

111(2)

If a cage referred to in subsection (1) is used in an underground shaft that is more than 30 metres deep, the employer must ensure that the cage is designed and certified by a professional engineer.

111(3)

Section 347 does not apply to a cage referred to in subsection (1) or (2) when the cage is transporting workers.

Vehicle Hoists
 

Safety standards

 

112

An employer must ensure that a vehicle hoist installed on or after July 1, 2009 meets the requirements of the following:

(a) ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALCTV‑2006, American National Standard for Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Construction, Testing, and Validation; or

(b) ANSI Standard ANSI/ALI ALOIM‑2000, Automotive Lifts — Safety Requirements for Operation, Inspection and Maintenance.

 

Safe use

 

113(1)

An employer must ensure that a pneumatic or hydraulic vehicle hoist has controls operated by constant manual pressure.

113(2)

An employer must ensure that the operator of a vehicle hoist

(a) remains at the controls while the vehicle hoist is in motion, and

(b) does not block the controls during raising and lowering.

113(3)

A worker must not be under a suspended load unless the load is supported by

(a) a vehicle hoist designed for that purpose, or

(b) stands or blocks, other than jacks, that are designed, constructed and maintained to support the load and placed on firm foundations.

Winching Operations
 

Safe practices

 

114

An operator of a winch must ensure that, before vehicle‑mounted winch lines are hooked or unhooked from an object, the vehicle is prevented from moving.